Article added to library!
x
Pubchase is a service of protocols.io - free, open access, crowdsourced protocols repository. Explore protocols.
Sign in
Reset password
or connect with
Facebook
By signing in you are agreeing to our
Terms Of Service and Privacy Policy
Biochemistry
RD26 mediates crosstalk between drought and brassinosteroid signalling pathways
Feb 24, 2017   Nature Communications
Ye H, Liu S, Tang B, Chen J, Xie Z,   . . . . . .   , Li Z, Aluru M, Aluru S, Schnable PS, Yin Y
RD26 mediates crosstalk between drought and brassinosteroid signalling pathways
Feb 24, 2017
Nature Communications
Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate plant growth and stress responses via the BES1/BZR1 family of transcription factors, which regulate the expression of thousands of downstream genes. BRs are involved in the response to drought, however the mechanistic understanding of interactions between BR signalling and drought response remains to be established. Here we show that transcription factor RD26 mediates crosstalk between drought and BR signalling. When overexpressed, BES1 target gene RD26 can inhibit BR-regulated growth. Global gene expression studies suggest that RD26 can act antagonistically to BR to regulate the expression of a subset of BES1-regulated genes, thereby inhibiting BR function. We show that RD26 can interact with BES1 protein and antagonize BES1 transcriptional activity on BR-regulated genes and that BR signalling can also repress expression of RD26 and its homologues and inhibit drought responses. Our results thus reveal a mechanism coordinating plant growth and drought tolerance.
Hyperactivation of Nrf2 in early tubular development induces nephrogenic diabetes insipidus
Feb 24, 2017   Nature Communications
Suzuki T, Seki S, Hiramoto K, Naganuma E, Kobayashi EH, Yamaoka A, Baird L, Takahashi N, Sato H, Yamamoto M
Hyperactivation of Nrf2 in early tubular development induces nephrogenic diabetes insipidus
Feb 24, 2017
Nature Communications
NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) regulates cellular responses to oxidative and electrophilic stress. Loss of Keap1 increases Nrf2 protein levels, and Keap1-null mice die of oesophageal hyperkeratosis because of Nrf2 hyperactivation. Here we show that deletion of oesophageal Nrf2 in Keap1-null mice allows survival until adulthood, but the animals develop polyuria with low osmolality and bilateral hydronephrosis. This phenotype is caused by defects in water reabsorption that are the result of reduced aquaporin 2 levels in the kidney. Renal tubular deletion of Keap1 promotes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus features, confirming that Nrf2 activation in developing tubular cells causes a water reabsorption defect. These findings suggest that Nrf2 activity should be tightly controlled during development in order to maintain renal homeostasis. In addition, tissue-specific ablation of Nrf2 in Keap1-null mice might create useful animal models to uncover novel physiological functions of Nrf2.
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells Overexpressing Interleukin-8 Receptors A/B and/or C-C Chemokine Receptors 2/5 Inhibit Vascular Injury Response
Feb 24, 2017   Stem Cells Translational Medicine
Giordano S, Zhao X, Chen YF, Litovsky SH, Hage FG, Townes TM, Sun CW, Wu LC, Oparil S, Xing D
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells Overexpressing Interleukin-8 Receptors A/B and/or C-C Chemokine Receptors 2/5 Inhibit Vascular Injury Response
Feb 24, 2017
Stem Cells Translational Medicine
Recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages to the site of vascular injury is mediated by binding of chemoattractants to interleukin (IL) 8 receptors RA and RB (IL8RA/B) C-C chemokine receptors (CCR) 2 and 5 expressed on neutrophil and monocyte/macrophage membranes. Endothelial cells (ECs) derived from rat-induced pluripotent stem cells (RiPS) were transduced with adenovirus containing cDNA of IL8RA/B and/or CCR2/5. We hypothesized that RiPS-ECs overexpressing IL8RA/B (RiPS-IL8RA/B-ECs), CCR2/5 (RiPS-CCR2/5-ECs), or both receptors (RiPS-IL8RA/B+CCR2/5-ECs) will inhibit inflammatory responses and neointima formation in balloon-injured rat carotid artery. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent balloon injury of the right carotid artery and intravenous infusion of (a) saline vehicle, (b) control RiPS-Null-ECs (ECs transduced with empty virus), (c) RiPS-IL8RA/B-ECs, (d) RiPS-CCR2/5-ECs, or (e) RiPS-IL8RA/B+CCR2/5-ECs. Inflammatory mediator expression and leukocyte infiltration were measured in injured and uninjured arteries at 24 hours postinjury by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Neointima formation was assessed at 14 days postinjury. RiPS-ECs expressing the IL8RA/B or CCR2/5 homing device targeted the injured arteries and decreased injury-induced inflammatory cytokine expression, neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, and neointima formation. Transfused RiPS-ECs overexpressing IL8RA/B and/or CCR2/5 prevented inflammatory responses and neointima formation after vascular injury. Targeted delivery of iPS-ECs with a homing device to inflammatory mediators in injured arteries provides a novel strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2016.© 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.
Polygamy slows down population divergence in shorebirds
Feb 24, 2017   Evolution; International Journal Of Organic Evolution
D'Urban Jackson J, Dos Remedios N, Maher KH, Zefania S, Haig S, Oyler-McCance S, Blomqvist D, Burke T, Bruford MW, Székely T, Küpper C
Polygamy slows down population divergence in shorebirds
Feb 24, 2017
Evolution; International Journal Of Organic Evolution
Sexual selection may act as a promotor of speciation since divergent mate choice and competition for mates can rapidly lead to reproductive isolation. Alternatively, sexual selection may also retard speciation since polygamous individuals can access additional mates by increased breeding dispersal. High breeding dispersal should hence increase gene flow and reduce diversification in polygamous species. Here we test how polygamy predicts diversification in shorebirds using genetic differentiation and subspecies richness as proxies for population divergence. Examining microsatellite data from 79 populations in ten plover species (Genus: Charadrius) we found that polygamous species display significantly less genetic structure and weaker isolation-by-distance effects than monogamous species. Consistent with this result, a comparative analysis including 136 shorebird species showed significantly fewer subspecies for polygamous than for monogamous species. By contrast, migratory behaviour neither predicted genetic differentiation nor subspecies richness. Taken together, our results suggest that dispersal associated with polygamy may facilitate gene flow and limit population divergence. Therefore, intense sexual selection, as occurs in polygamous species, may act as a brake rather than an engine of speciation in shorebirds. We discuss alternative explanations for these results and call for further studies to understand the relationships between sexual selection, dispersal and diversification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Hedgehog signalling in myeloid cells impacts on body weight, adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism
Feb 24, 2017   Diabetologia
Braune J, Weyer U, Matz-Soja M, Hobusch C, Kern M, Kunath A, Klöting N, Kralisch S, Blüher M, Gebhardt R, Zavros Y, Bechmann I, Gericke M
Hedgehog signalling in myeloid cells impacts on body weight, adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism
Feb 24, 2017
Diabetologia
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, hedgehog (Hh) was identified as a crucial player in adipose tissue development and energy expenditure. Therefore, we tested whether Hh ligands are regulated in obesity. Further, we aimed at identifying potential target cells of Hh signalling and studied the functional impact of Hh signalling on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism. METHODS: Hh ligands and receptors were analysed in adipose tissue or serum from lean and obese mice as well as in humans. To study the impact on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism, Hh signalling was specifically blocked in myeloid cells using a conditional knockout approach (Lys-Smo RESULTS: Desert Hh (DHH) and Indian Hh (IHH) are local Hh ligands, whereas Sonic Hh is not expressed in adipose tissue from mice or humans. In mice, obesity leads to a preferential upregulation of Hh ligands (Dhh) and signalling components (Ptch1, Smo and Gli1) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Further, adipose tissue macrophages are Hh target cells owing to the expression of Hh receptors, such as Patched1 and 2. Conditional knockout of Smo (which encodes Smoothened, a mandatory Hh signalling component) in myeloid cells increases body weight and adipose tissue inflammation and attenuates glucose tolerance, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect of Hh signalling. In humans, adipose tissue expression of DHH and serum IHH decrease with obesity and type 2 diabetes, which might be explained by the intake of metformin. Interestingly, metformin reduced Dhh and Ihh expression in mouse adipose tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Hh signalling in myeloid cells affects adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism and may be a potential target to treat type 2 diabetes.
IFN-γ is required for cytotoxic T cell-dependent cancer genome immunoediting
Feb 24, 2017   Nature Communications
Takeda K, Nakayama M, Hayakawa Y, Kojima Y, Ikeda H, Imai N, Ogasawara K, Okumura K, Thomas DM, Smyth MJ
IFN-γ is required for cytotoxic T cell-dependent cancer genome immunoediting
Feb 24, 2017
Nature Communications
Genetic evolution that occurs during cancer progression enables tumour heterogeneity, thereby fostering tumour adaptation, therapeutic resistance and metastatic potential. Immune responses are known to select (immunoedit) tumour cells displaying immunoevasive properties. Here we address the role of IFN-γ in mediating the immunoediting process. We observe that, in several mouse tumour models such as HA-expressing 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells, OVA-expressing EG7 lymphoma cells and CMS5 MCA-induced fibrosarcoma cells naturally expressing mutated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) antigen, the action of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell (CTL) in vivo results in the emergence of resistant cancer cell clones only in the presence of IFN-γ within the tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we show that exposure of tumours to IFN-γ-producing antigen-specific CTLs in vivo results in copy-number alterations (CNAs) associated with DNA damage response and modulation of DNA editing/repair gene expression. These results suggest that enhanced genetic instability might be one of the mechanisms by which CTLs and IFN-γ immunoedits tumours, altering their immune resistance as a result of genetic evolution.
Epitopes of anti-RIFIN antibodies and characterization of rif-expressing Plasmodium falciparum parasites by RNA sequencing
Feb 24, 2017   Scientific Reports
Ch'ng JH, Sirel M, Zandian A, Del Pilar Quintana M, Chun Leung Chan S, Moll K, Tellgren-Roth A, Nilsson I, Nilsson P, Qundos U, Wahlgren M
Epitopes of anti-RIFIN antibodies and characterization of rif-expressing Plasmodium falciparum parasites by RNA sequencing
Feb 24, 2017
Scientific Reports
Variable surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum have been a major research focus since they facilitate parasite sequestration and give rise to deadly malaria complications. Coupled with its potential use as a vaccine candidate, the recent suggestion that the repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) mediate blood group A rosetting and influence blood group distribution has raised the research profile of these adhesins. Nevertheless, detailed investigations into the functions of this highly diverse multigene family remain hampered by the limited number of validated reagents. In this study, we assess the specificities of three promising polyclonal anti-RIFIN antibodies that were IgG-purified from sera of immunized animals. Their epitope regions were mapped using a 175,000-peptide microarray holding overlapping peptides of the P. falciparum variable surface antigens. Through immunoblotting and immunofluorescence imaging, we show that different antibodies give varying results in different applications/assays. Finally, we authenticate the antibody-based detection of RIFINs in two previously uncharacterized non-rosetting parasite lines by identifying the dominant rif transcripts using RNA sequencing.
Intermetallic Nanocrystals: Syntheses and Catalytic Applications
Feb 24, 2017   Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.)
Yan Y, Du JS, Gilroy KD, Yang D, Xia Y, Zhang H
Intermetallic Nanocrystals: Syntheses and Catalytic Applications
Feb 24, 2017
Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.)
At the forefront of nanochemistry, there exists a research endeavor centered around intermetallic nanocrystals, which are unique in terms of long-range atomic ordering, well-defined stoichiometry, and controlled crystal structure. In contrast to alloy nanocrystals with no elemental ordering, it is challenging to synthesize intermetallic nanocrystals with a tight control over their size and shape. Here, recent progress in the synthesis of intermetallic nanocrystals with controllable sizes and well-defined shapes is highlighted. A simple analysis and some insights key to the selection of experimental conditions for generating intermetallic nanocrystals are presented, followed by examples to highlight the viable use of intermetallic nanocrystals as electrocatalysts or catalysts for various reactions, with a focus on the enhanced performance relative to their alloy counterparts that lack elemental ordering. Within the conclusion, perspectives on future developments in the context of synthetic control, structure-property relationships, and applications are discussed.© 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
The Potential Role of Gut-Derived Inflammation in Multiple System Atrophy
Feb 24, 2017   Journal Of Parkinson's Disease
Engen PA, Dodiya HB, Naqib A, Forsyth CB, Green SJ, Voigt RM, Kordower JH, Mutlu EA, Shannon KM, Keshavarzian A
The Potential Role of Gut-Derived Inflammation in Multiple System Atrophy
Feb 24, 2017
Journal Of Parkinson's Disease
BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with intestinal microbiota dysbiosis, abnormal intestinal permeability, and intestinal inflammation. OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to determine if these gut abnormalities are present in another synucleinopathy, multiple system atrophy (MSA). METHODS: In six MSA and 11 healthy control subjects, we performed immunohistochemistry studies of colonic sigmoid mucosa to evaluate the intestinal barrier marker Zonula Occludens-1 and the endotoxin-related inflammation marker Toll-like-receptor-4 expression. We also assessed colonic sigmoid mucosal and fecal microbiota compositions using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing. RESULTS: MSA subjects showed disrupted tight junction protein Zonula Occludens-1 structure in sigmoid mucosa tissue suggesting intestinal barrier dysfunction. The lipopolysaccharide specific inflammatory receptor Toll-like-receptor-4 was significantly higher in the colonic sigmoid mucosa in MSA relative to healthy controls. Microbiota analysis suggested high relative abundance of gram-negative, putative "pro-inflammatory" bacteria in various family and genus level taxa, from the phylum Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, in MSA feces and mucosa. At the taxonomic level of genus, putative "anti-inflammatory" butyrate-producing bacteria were less abundant in MSA feces. Predictive functional analysis indicated that the relative abundance of a number of genes involved in metabolism were lower in MSA feces, whereas the relative abundance of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were higher in both MSA feces and mucosa compared to healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: This proof-of-concept study provides preliminary evidence that like PD, MSA subjects display evidence of disrupted intestinal barrier integrity, increased marker of endotoxin-related intestinal inflammation, and pro-inflammatory colonic microbiota.
Iron accumulation and dysregulation in the putamen in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
Feb 24, 2017   Movement Disorders : Official Journal Of The Movement Disorder Society
Ariza J, Rogers H, Hartvigsen A, Snell M, Dill M, Judd D, Hagerman P, Martínez-Cerdeño V
Iron accumulation and dysregulation in the putamen in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome
Feb 24, 2017
Movement Disorders : Official Journal Of The Movement Disorder Society
BACKGROUND: Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome is an adult-onset disorder associated with premutation alleles of the FMR1 gene. This disorder is characterized by progressive action tremor, gait ataxia, and cognitive decline. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome pathology includes dystrophic white matter and intranuclear inclusions in neurons and astrocytes. We previously demonstrated that the transport of iron into the brain is altered in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome; therefore, we also expect an alteration of iron metabolism in brain areas related to motor control. Iron is essential for cell metabolism, but uncomplexed iron leads to oxidative stress and contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated a potential iron modification in the putamen - a structure that participates in motor learning and performance - in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. METHODS: We used samples of putamen obtained from 9 fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome and 9 control cases to study iron localization using Perl's method, and iron-binding proteins using immunostaining. RESULTS: We found increased iron deposition in neuronal and glial cells in the putamen in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. We also found a generalized decrease in the amount of the iron-binding proteins transferrin and ceruloplasmin, and decreased number of neurons and glial cells that contained ceruloplasmin. However, we found increased levels of iron, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin in microglial cells, indicating an attempt by the immune system to remove the excess iron. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, found a deficit in proteins that eliminate extra iron from the cells with a concomitant increase in the deposit of cellular iron in the putamen in Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
Interplay between Penicillin-binding proteins and SEDS proteins promotes bacterial cell wall synthesis
Feb 24, 2017   Scientific Reports
Leclercq S, Derouaux A, Olatunji S, Fraipont C, Egan AJ, Vollmer W, Breukink E, Terrak M
Interplay between Penicillin-binding proteins and SEDS proteins promotes bacterial cell wall synthesis
Feb 24, 2017
Scientific Reports
Bacteria utilize specialized multi-protein machineries to synthesize the essential peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall during growth and division. The divisome controls septal PG synthesis and separation of daughter cells. In E. coli, the lipid II transporter candidate FtsW is thought to work in concert with the PG synthases penicillin-binding proteins PBP3 and PBP1b. Yet, the exact molecular mechanisms of their function in complexes are largely unknown. We show that FtsW interacts with PBP1b and lipid II and that PBP1b, FtsW and PBP3 co-purify suggesting that they form a trimeric complex. We also show that the large loop between transmembrane helices 7 and 8 of FtsW is important for the interaction with PBP3. Moreover, we found that FtsW, but not the other flippase candidate MurJ, impairs lipid II polymerization and peptide cross-linking activities of PBP1b, and that PBP3 relieves these inhibitory effects. All together the results suggest that FtsW interacts with lipid II preventing its polymerization by PBP1b unless PBP3 is also present, indicating that PBP3 facilitates lipid II release and/or its transfer to PBP1b after transport across the cytoplasmic membrane. This tight regulatory mechanism is consistent with the cell's need to ensure appropriate use of the limited pool of lipid II.
Clinical and Molecular Assessment in a Female with Fragile X Syndrome and Tuberous Sclerosis
Feb 24, 2017   Journal Of Genetic Disorders & Genetic Reports
Yrigollen CM, Pacini L, Nobile V, Lozano R, Hagerman RJ, Bagni C, Tassone F
Clinical and Molecular Assessment in a Female with Fragile X Syndrome and Tuberous Sclerosis
Feb 24, 2017
Journal Of Genetic Disorders & Genetic Reports
OBJECTIVE: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and tuberous sclerosis (TSC) are genetic disorders that result in intellectual disability and an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While the clinical presentation of each disorder is distinct, the molecular causes are linked to a disruption in the mTORC1 (mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1) and ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase) signaling pathways. METHODS: We assessed the clinical and molecular characteristics of an individual seen at the UC Davis MIND Institute with a diagnosis of FXS and TSC. Clinical evaluation of physical, behavioral, and cognitive impairments were performed. Additionally, total and phosphorylated proteins along the mTORC1 and ERK1/2 pathways were measured in primary fibroblast cell lines from the proband. RESULTS: In this case the phenotypic effects that result in a human with both FXS and TSC are shown to be severe. Changes in mTORC1 and ERK1/2 signaling proteins and global protein synthesis were not found to be noticeably different between four cohorts (typically developing, CONCLUSION: It has previously been suggested that disruption of the mTORC1 pathway was reciprocal in TSC and FXS double knock-out mouse models so that the regulation of these pathways were more similar to wild-type mice compared to mice harboring a
Sporulation, bacterial cell envelopes and the origin of life
Feb 24, 2017   Nature Reviews. Microbiology
Tocheva EI, Ortega DR, Jensen GJ
Sporulation, bacterial cell envelopes and the origin of life
Feb 24, 2017
Nature Reviews. Microbiology
Electron cryotomography (ECT) enables the 3D reconstruction of intact cells in a near-native state. Images produced by ECT have led to the proposal that an ancient sporulation-like event gave rise to the second membrane in diderm bacteria. Tomograms of sporulating monoderm and diderm bacterial cells show how sporulation can lead to the generation of diderm cells. Tomograms of Gram-negative and Gram-positive cell walls and purified sacculi suggest that they are more closely related than previously thought and support the hypothesis that they share a common origin. Mapping the distribution of cell envelope architectures onto a recent phylogenetic tree of life indicates that the diderm cell plan, and therefore the sporulation-like event that gave rise to it, must be very ancient. One explanation for this model is that during the cataclysmic transitions of the early Earth, cellular evolution may have gone through a bottleneck in which only spores survived, which implies that the last bacterial common ancestor was a spore.
Beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II predicts poor prognosis of patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma
Feb 24, 2017   Tumour Biology : The Journal Of The International Society For Oncodevelopmental Biology And Medicine
Zhang H, Liu Y, Xie H, Fu Q, Liu Z, Zhu Y, Xu L, Zhang W, Yang Y, Xu J
Beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II predicts poor prognosis of patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma
Feb 24, 2017
Tumour Biology : The Journal Of The International Society For Oncodevelopmental Biology And Medicine
Beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II is found to be associated with the alterations of tumor-related glycosylation. However, the clinical significance of beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II in non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma has not been reported up to now. Herein, our researches suggested that the expression level of beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II was first found to be positively associated with tumor size, Fuhrman grade, lymphovascular invasion, rhabdoid differentiation, tumor necrosis and poor overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma, both in training set and validation set. Moreover, beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II expression was identified as an independent adverse prognosticator for overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. Ultimately, prognostic accuracy of the nomogram integrating beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II with other independent prognostic parameters was dramatically improved for overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. Taken together, beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase II is a potential independent adverse prognostic factor for postoperative recurrence and survival, which could be developed as a useful biomarker for non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma by a series of further independent and retrospective studies, so as to help the postsurgical management of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma patients.
Corrigendum to 'Sinu virus, a novel and divergent orthomyxovirus related to members of the genus Thogotovirus isolated from mosquitoes in Colombia' [Virology 501 (2017) 166-175]
Feb 24, 2017   Virology
Contreras-Gutiérrez MA, Nunes MR, Guzman H, Uribe S, Suaza Vasco JD, Cardoso JF, Popov VL, Widen SG, Wood TG, Vasilakis N, Tesh RB
Evaluating the Effect of Lidocaine on the Interactions of C-reactive Protein with Its Aptamer and Antibody by Dynamic Force Spectroscopy
Feb 24, 2017   Analytical Chemistry
Li Z, Wang Q, Yang X, Wang K, Du S, Zhang H, Gao L, Zheng Y, Nie W
Evaluating the Effect of Lidocaine on the Interactions of C-reactive Protein with Its Aptamer and Antibody by Dynamic Force Spectroscopy
Feb 24, 2017
Analytical Chemistry
Effects of medicine on the biomolecular interaction have been given extensive attention in biochemistry and biomedicine because of the complexity of the environment in vivo and the increasing opportunity of exposure to medicine. Herein, the effect of lidocaine on the interactions of C-reactive protein (CRP) with its aptamer and antibody under different temperature was investigated through dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS). The results revealed that lidocaine could reduce the binding probabilities and binding affinities of CRP-aptamer and CRP-antibody. An interesting discovery was that lidocaine had differential influences on the dynamic force spectra of CRP-aptamer and CRP-antibody. The energy landscape of CRP-aptamer turned from two activation barriers to one after the treatment of lidocaine, while the one activation barrier in energy landscape of CRP-antibody almost remained unchanged. In addition, similar results were obtained for 25oC and 37oC. According to the result of molecular docking, the reduction of binding probabilities might be due to the binding of lidocaine on CRP. Additionally, the alteration of dissociation pathway of CRP-aptamer and the change of binding affinities might be caused by the conformational change of CRP, which was verified through synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, differential effects of lidocaine on the interactions of CRP-aptamer and CRP-antibody might be attributed to the different dissociation processes and binding sites of CRP-aptamer and CRP-antibody, and different structures of aptamer and antibody. This work indicated that DFS provided information for further research and comprehensive applications of biomolecular interaction, especially in the design of biosensors in complex systems.
[Correlative factors on prevalence rate of dislipidemia among 1 337 coal miners in Shanxi province]
Feb 23, 2017   Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi = Zhonghua Liuxingbingxue Zazhi
Fu ZD, Wen DD, Wang B, Xue SL, Liu GS, Li XH, Zhao ZH, Wang J, Wei BG, Wang SP
Leg vascular and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic high-intensity exercise training are enhanced in the early postmenopausal phase
Feb 23, 2017   The Journal Of Physiology
Nyberg M, Egelund J, Mandrup CM, Andersen CB, Hansen KM, Hergel IF, Valbak-Andersen N, Frikke-Schmidt R, Stallknecht B, Bangsbo J, Hellsten Y
Leg vascular and skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations to aerobic high-intensity exercise training are enhanced in the early postmenopausal phase
Feb 23, 2017
The Journal Of Physiology
Exercise training leads to favourable adaptations within skeletal muscle; however, this effect of exercise training may be blunted in postmenopausal women due to the loss of oestrogens. Furthermore, postmenopausal women may have an impaired vascular response to acute exercise. We examined the haemodynamic response to acute exercise in matched pre- and postmenopausal women before and after 12 weeks of aerobic high intensity exercise training. Twenty premenopausal and 16 early postmenopausal (3.1 ± 0.5 [mean ± SEM] years after final menstrual period) women only separated by 4 (50 ± 0 versus 54 ± 1) years of age were included. Before training, leg blood flow, OThis article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Safety evaluation of soybean protein isolate oxidized by a hydroxyl radical-generating system
Feb 24, 2017   Food And Chemical Toxicology : An International Journal Published For The British Industrial Biological Research Association
Hao X, Sun H, Liu W, Li L, Zhao H, Li Y, Zhang D, Shao M
Safety evaluation of soybean protein isolate oxidized by a hydroxyl radical-generating system
Feb 24, 2017
Food And Chemical Toxicology : An International Journal Published For The British Industrial Biological Research Association
The oxidative modification of soybean protein isolate (SPI) induced by a hydroxyl radical-generating system (HRGS) has a broad range of applications. However, few toxicology studies exist on this material. The safety of HRGS-oxidized SPI was assessed using subchronic and genotoxicity studies. A 30-day subchronic study (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg*BW) in rats showed no significant adverse effects on food consumption, body weight (BW), mortality, hematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight or histopathology. The result of an Ames test showed that HRGS-oxidized SPI was not mutagenic to the test strains. The results of a bone marrow micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test showed HRGS-oxidized SPI (417.5, 835.0 and 1670.0 mg/kg*BW) did not produce any aberrant effects on bone marrow cells or mouse sperm. Therefore, HRGS-oxidized SPI showed no genotoxicity in vivo or in vitro. In conclusion, these results support the safe use of HRGS-oxidized SPI as a food and dietary supplement.Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Homozygous mutation in TXNRD1 is associated with genetic generalized epilepsy
Feb 24, 2017   Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Kudin AP, Baron G, Zsurka G, Hampel KG, Elger CE,   . . . . . .   , Schomburg L, Seeher S, Fradejas-Villar N, Schweizer U, Kunz WS
Homozygous mutation in TXNRD1 is associated with genetic generalized epilepsy
Feb 24, 2017
Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Increased oxidative stress has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis in various forms of human epilepsy. Here, we report a homozygous mutation in TXNRD1 (thioredoxin reductase 1) in a family with genetic generalized epilepsy. TXNRD1 is an essential selenium-containing enzyme involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling. The TXNRD1 mutation p.Pro190Leu affecting a highly conserved amino acid residue was identified by whole-exome sequencing of blood DNA from the index patient. The detected mutation and its segregation within the family - all siblings of the index patient were homozygous and the parents heterozygous - were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. TXNRD1 activity was determined in subcellular fractions from a skeletal muscle biopsy and skin fibroblasts of the index patient and the expression levels of the mutated protein were assessed by Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
The cytotoxic
Feb 24, 2017   Science (New York, N.Y.)
Tayeb-Fligelman E, Tabachnikov O, Moshe A, Goldshmidt-Tran O, Sawaya MR, Coquelle N, Colletier JP, Landau M
The cytotoxic
Feb 24, 2017
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Amyloids are ordered protein aggregates, found in all kingdoms of life, and are involved in aggregation diseases as well as in physiological activities. In microbes, functional amyloids are often key virulence determinants, yet the structural basis for their activity remains elusive. We determined the fibril structure and function of the highly toxic, 22-residue phenol-soluble modulin α3 (PSMα3) peptide secreted by Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Cell-wide analysis of protein thermal unfolding reveals determinants of thermostability
Feb 24, 2017   Science (New York, N.Y.)
Leuenberger P, Ganscha S, Kahraman A, Cappelletti V, Boersema PJ, von Mering C, Claassen M, Picotti P
Cell-wide analysis of protein thermal unfolding reveals determinants of thermostability
Feb 24, 2017
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Temperature-induced cell death is thought to be due to protein denaturation, but the determinants of thermal sensitivity of proteomes remain largely uncharacterized. We developed a structural proteomic strategy to measure protein thermostability on a proteome-wide scale and with domain-level resolution. We applied it to Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport
Feb 24, 2017   Science (New York, N.Y.)
O'Brien E, Holt ME, Thompson MK, Salay LE, Ehlinger AC, Chazin WJ, Barton JK
The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport
Feb 24, 2017
Science (New York, N.Y.)
DNA charge transport chemistry offers a means of long-range, rapid redox signaling. We demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster in human DNA primase can make use of this chemistry to coordinate the first steps of DNA synthesis. Using DNA electrochemistry, we found that a change in oxidation state of the [4Fe4S] cluster acts as a switch for DNA binding. Single-atom mutations that inhibit this charge transfer hinder primase initiation without affecting primase structure or polymerization. Generating a single base mismatch in the growing primer duplex, which attenuates DNA charge transport, inhibits primer truncation. Thus, redox signaling by [4Fe4S] clusters using DNA charge transport regulates primase binding to DNA and illustrates chemistry that may efficiently drive substrate handoff between polymerases during DNA replication.Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Hepatic DsbA-L protects mice from diet-induced hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance
Feb 24, 2017   FASEB Journal : Official Publication Of The Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology
Chen H, Bai J, Dong F, Fang H, Zhang Y,   . . . . . .   , Wu J, Zeng R, Zhou Z, Dong LQ, Liu F
Hepatic DsbA-L protects mice from diet-induced hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance
Feb 24, 2017
FASEB Journal : Official Publication Of The Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology
Hepatic insulin resistance and hepatosteatosis in diet-induced obesity are associated with various metabolic diseases, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the expression levels of the disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L) are significantly reduced in the liver of obese mice and humans. Liver-specific knockout or adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DsbA-L exacerbates or alleviates, respectively, high-fat diet-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, hepatosteatosis, and insulin resistance in mice. Mechanistically, we found that DsbA-L is localized in mitochondria and that its deficiency is associated with impairment of maximum respiratory capacity, elevated cellular oxidative stress, and increased JNK activity. Our results identify DsbA-L as a critical regulator of mitochondrial function, and its down-regulation in the liver may contribute to obesity-induced hepatosteatosis and whole body insulin resistance.-Chen, H., Bai, J., Dong, F., Fang, H., Zhang, Y., Meng, W., Liu, B., Luo, Y., Liu, M., Bai, Y., Abdul-Ghani, M. A., Li, R., Wu, J., Zeng, R., Zhou, Z., Dong, L. Q., Liu, F. Hepatic DsbA-L protects mice from diet-induced hepatosteatosis and insulin resistance.© FASEB.
Parkinson Sac Domain Mutation in Synaptojanin 1 Impairs Clathrin Uncoating at Synapses and Triggers Dystrophic Changes in Dopaminergic Axons
Feb 23, 2017   Neuron
Cao M, Wu Y, Ashrafi G, McCartney AJ, Wheeler H, Bushong EA, Boassa D, Ellisman MH, Ryan TA, De Camilli P
Parkinson Sac Domain Mutation in Synaptojanin 1 Impairs Clathrin Uncoating at Synapses and Triggers Dystrophic Changes in Dopaminergic Axons
Feb 23, 2017
Neuron
Synaptojanin 1 (SJ1) is a major presynaptic phosphatase that couples synaptic vesicle endocytosis to the dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)PCopyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

The link you entered does not seem to be valid

Please make sure the link points to nature.com contains a valid shared_access_token

Downloading PDF to your library...

Uploading PDF...

PDF uploading

Delete tag: