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NEB
Do non-prestigious pre-doctoral fellowships help with finding jobs as a post-doc fellow after graduation?
Bulent Arman Aksoy
Posted on Jan 29, 2014
predoctoral fellowship competition
Jan 29, 2014 3:12 am

Accepted answer
Your question is difficult to answer in the abstract, but here are a few things to keep in mind.

One consideration is the amount of funds associated with these fellowships and the relative cost versus benefit of the application. In round numbers, it takes about $4500 a month to keep a typical graduate student in biomedical research fully engaged. I am including the usual range of stipend, tuition and fees and supplies to get this number. Obviously if it takes a week to compete for a $1000 fellowship, you would not be adequately rewarded. I would put as much time into such an application as makes sense for the size of the award.

But let’s assume that you are asking about a typical full ride fellowship. For a PI to support a graduate student requires a very significant effort in terms of raising grant funding in the face of very stiff competition. Then if the competition is successful, grants are often funded at a lower level than was requested to accomplish the aims of the grant. Hence, any additional funding that a student or postdoc can bring in can make a huge contribution to the success of a partially funded research program and increase its chances for renewal, hopefully at a fuller level of support. So on a very pragmatic basis, are these applications worth the effort? Yes! Moreover, the competition for in-house funding is, by definition, much less intense than an open national or international competition and hence offers the opportunity to hone one's skills in an environment with better odd of success.

That said, I have never selected a student or postdoc for my lab based upon what fellowships he or she may have received in the past. As with any measure of merit, these contribute incrementally to the success of an application in the sense that such successes speak to the depth of experience of a candidate. However the absence of such fellowship awards certainly does not count against an applicant because none of us have a comprehensive view of the criteria and level of competition for various institution-specific awards. I leave it to those with local knowledge and who write letters of recommendation for a candidate to comment on awards that are of noteworthy significance.

As with most measures of merit, no individual measure is critical, but all of them can contribute to the success of an application.
m Jasper Rine
Answered on Jan 29, 2014
4   Jan 29, 2014 6:27 am

I agree with Jasper too. This is the most profitable option for you.

Jess Mccann
Answered on Oct 14, 2016
0   Oct 14, 2016 6:42 pm

I agree with Jasper too. This is the most profitable option for you.

Jess Mccann
Answered on Oct 14, 2016
0   Oct 14, 2016 6:42 pm

I agree with Jasper too. This is the most profitable option for you.

Jess Mccann
Answered on Oct 14, 2016
0   Oct 14, 2016 6:42 pm

I agree with Jasper too. This is the most profitable option for you.

Jess Mccann
Answered on Oct 14, 2016
0   Oct 14, 2016 6:42 pm
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